My Blog
By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
August 15, 2017
Tags: Baby Food  

Solid Baby FoodGiving your baby his first spoonful of solid foods is an exciting time! Many parents look forward to the day their little one takes their first bite of rice cereal, and in many cases, baby is just as eager! So how do you know if your baby is ready to transition to solids?

Here are a few tips for helping you introduce and successfully navigate feeding your baby solids.

Is my baby ready for solids?

As a general rule, most babies are ready to tackle solids between 4 and 6 months of age.

  • Weight gain. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, babies are typically big enough to consume solids when they reach about 13 pounds—or about the time they double their birth weight.
  • Head control. Your baby must be able to sit up unsupported and have good head and neck control.  
  • Heightened curiosity. It may be time to introduce your baby to solids when they begin to take interest in the foods around them. Opening of the mouth, chewing motions and staring at your plate at the dinner table are all good indicators it’s time to give solid foods a try.

Getting started

To start, give your baby half a spoonful or less of one type of solid food. Generally it doesn’t matter which food is introduced first, but many parents begin with an iron-fortified rice cereal. Once they master one type of food, then you can gradually give them new foods.

Other foods, such as small banana pieces, scrambled eggs and well-done pasta can also be given to the baby as finger foods. This is usually around the time the baby can sit up and bring their hands or other objects to their mouth.

As your baby learns to eat a few different foods, gradually expose them to a wide variety of flavors and textures from all food groups. In addition to continuing breast milk or formula, you can also introduce meats, cereals, fruits and vegetables. It’s important to watch for allergic reactions as new foods are incorporated into your baby’s diet. If you suspect an allergy, stop using that food and contact your pediatrician.

Talk to your pediatrician for recommendations about feeding your baby solid foods. Your pediatrician can answer any questions you have about nutrition, eating habits and changes to expect as your baby embarks on a solid food diet.

By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
August 01, 2017
Tags: Eczema  

It’s normal for a child to get a rash at one time or another. But one common type of rash, known as eczema, can be especially troubling. Eczema refers to many types of skin inflammation, with atopic dermatitis being one of the most common forms of eczema to develop during a baby’s first year.  

You may first notice signs that your child has eczema as early as one to four months of age, appearing as a red, raised rash usually on the face, behind the knees and in the bends of elbows. The rash is typically very itchy and with time may spread and lead to an infection. The patches can range from small and mild to extremely itchy, which may make a small child irritable.

While the exact cause of eczema is not known, the tendency to have eczema is often inherited. Allergens or irritants in the environment, such as winter weather, pollen or certain foods, can trigger the rash. For most infants and small children, eczema improves during childhood. In the meantime, however, parents should help reduce the triggers that cause eczema outbreaks and control the itch to prevent infection.

Managing Eczema

While there is no cure for eczema at this time, there is treatment. Talk to your pediatrician about ways to alleviate itching and reduce the rash. Minimizing how often a child scratches the rash is especially important as the more the child scratches, the greater the risk of infection.

To prevent flare-ups and help your child cope with eczema, parents should follow these tips:

  • With your doctor’s direction, use antihistamine to relieve itching and reduce scratching.
  • Minimize nighttime itching by having child sleep in long-sleeved clothing to prevent scratching through the night.
  • Apply cortisone creams or medication to reduce inflammation.
  • Use mild soaps during bathing and avoid frequent, hot baths, as they will dry out the child’s skin.
  • Wrap moist bandages around the affected areas of the skin before bed to soothe and rehydrate the child’s skin.
  • Avoid triggers that aggravate eczema, such as rapid changes in temperatures or seasonal allergies.

Many kids will outgrow atopic dermatitis, but it is still important to treat the condition right away to keep it from getting worse. Work with your pediatrician to find the best combination of skin care strategies and medications to ease the itch and inflammation and keep infection at bay.

By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
July 17, 2017
Tags: Asthma  

Child AsthmaA common condition seen in kids and teens, asthma is a lung condition that causes trouble breathing and shortness of breath. During an attack, the bronchial airways become inflamed and the muscles surrounding them constrict, making breathing difficult. Repeated attacks may cause permanent lung damage and in severe cases can be life-threatening. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, more than 23 million Americans have the condition and more than one-quarter of them are children under the age of 18.

Asthma Causes

There are a variety of triggers that can lead to an asthma flare-up or make asthma worse. These vary for every person, but common triggers include:

  • Allergens, such as animal dander, pollens, mold and house dust mites
  • Environmental irritants, such as cigarettes, dry air, fragrances and air pollution
  • Infections, such as pneumonia, sinus infection and viral infections of the nose and throat
  • Exercise
  • Stress

Does my child have asthma?

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, asthma is the most common chronic medical problem in children. Asthma symptoms will vary in frequency and severity, and most children with asthma develop their first symptoms before the age of five.  Common signs include:

  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Tightness in chest

If you think your child may have asthma, contact your pediatrician. They can help you identify the early signs of childhood asthma and provide support for prevention and treatment.

A child may be at a greater risk for having asthma if there is a family history of asthma or if the child has eczema or frequent bouts of chronic lower respiratory problems occurring before the first birthday.  Keeping your kids away from cigarette smoke in the home or car, removing pets from the house, paying attention to pollen and air quality forecasts and monitoring exercise are all ways to reduce asthma problems.  

The good news is that the majority of asthma cases are only mild, and when the condition is properly managed with medications and extra caution, severe asthma flare-ups can be prevented.  Work with your child’s pediatrician to learn more about the condition and ensure your child leads a healthy, normal, active life.

By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
July 13, 2017
Category: Child Care

You never know when your child will become ill; it’s comforting to know your doctor is always there!After Hours Urgent Care

Whether your child gets injured on the playing field or your little one comes home sick from a sleepover, there are many scenarios that may make a parent panic. After all, where are you going to find a doctor to treat your child's sudden health problems at such odd hours? Sitting in the ER for hours on end is less than ideal. Fortunately, our Greenwich, CT, pediatricians Dr. Karen Beckman, Dr. Alejandro Mones and Dr. Beth Rosenberg can help.

Here at Riverside Pediatrics, LLC, we make it easy for your child to get the medical attention they need without even needing an appointment. That’s right! If your child is dealing with an urgent matter that needs to be addressed right away, we are here to help.

We welcome all children into our practice who are dealing with urgent matters. You don’t even have to be a regular patient here at Riverside Pediatrics, LLC. We are open 365 days a year because we know that not even illnesses or injuries take a holiday.

We provide an amazing array of services and treatments to handle all of your child’s immediate medical needs. Some reasons to bring them into our office include:

  • Insect bites
  • Asthma and allergic reactions
  • Ear infections
  • Fever
  • Strep throat
  • Rashes
  • Pneumonia
  • Lyme disease
  • Mononucleosis
  • Dehydration
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Vomiting
  • Pink Eye
  • Diarrhea

….and the list just continues. If there is any condition or symptom that manifests that has you concerned it’s always best to play it safe and visit our Greenwich, CT, children’s doctors. We have a variety of diagnostic tests and treatments right at our disposal, from rapid strep tests to vaccinations and wart removal.

Of course, it’s important to note that while we can treat a broad spectrum of urgent health matters, we cannot treat life-threatening problems. If a child may require overnight monitoring and care, you’ll need to take them to your local emergency room right away.

Riverside Pediatrics, LLC prides itself on providing quality pediatric care to children of the Fairfield County area. Don’t let an urgent medical matter go ignored. We are here to make sure your child gets the best care possible whenever they need it most.

By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
July 05, 2017
Tags: Nutrition  

Healthy Meals for TeensAs children grow into adolescence, their bodies require more nutrients to grow healthy and strong. But as many parents know, for those teens with busy school schedules, sports practices and jobs, managing a healthy, well-balanced meal plan isn’t always at the top of their priority list. In many cases, a teen’s most important meals are eaten in the car or on the bus as they shuffle from one activity to the next.

Parents can play a very important role in influencing their teen to stay active while maintaining a healthy diet. These tips can help:

  • Encourage your teen to not skip meals, especially breakfast. A well-balanced breakfast is essential to keeping your son or daughter nourished throughout the day.
  • Educate your teen about healthy snack choices. Stock your refrigerator and cabinets with healthy foods and snacks, such as nuts, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat milk and lean meats and poultry. Avoid buying sodas and other sugary drinks and foods that are low in nutritional value.
  • Involve your teen in the selection and preparation of foods to teach them to make healthy choices.
  • Teach your teen how to make healthy selections when eating out at restaurants.

How many servings per day your teenager requires will depend on how many calories his or her body needs. This is based on age, sex, size and activity level. You can discuss your teen’s nutritional habits and recommended daily intake with your teen's pediatrician.

Although balancing school, sports and social activities may present challenges to eating healthy, it is possible to guide your teen on a path of nutritional food choices. Educate them now and promote healthy eating at home to help your teen develop a good understanding of proper nutrition into adulthood. The whole family can benefit from improved eating habits starting at home.





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1171 East Putnam Avenue Unit 2B Riverside, CT 06878