My Blog
By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
December 04, 2017
Category: Child Care
Tags: Sore Throats  

Child with Sore ThroatIn infants, toddlers and preschoolers, the most frequent cause of sore throats is a viral infection. No specific medicine is required when a virus is responsible, and the child should get better over a seven to ten day period. During this period, your child may develop a fever, but they generally are not very sick. 

It is not uncommon to experience a sore throat when your child has a cold or the flu. Unfortunately, there are other reasons for sore throats to develop that may be symptomatic of more serious problems.  Children tend to have sore throats more often than adolescents or adults, with sore throats being the most common during the winter months when upper respiratory infections are more frequent. 

The major cause of a sore throat is an infection, whether it is viral or bacterial, and can also be caused by allergies and environmental conditions. If your child has a sore throat that lasts longer than the typical five to seven day duration of a cold or flu, and is not associated with an avoidable allergy or irritation, it is important to contact your local pediatrician. The following are signs and symptoms to alert you to take your child to the pediatrician:

  • Severe and prolonged sore throat
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Difficulty opening the mouth
  • Joint pain
  • Earache
  • Rash
  • Fever that is over 101 degrees
  • Frequent recurring sore throat
  • Lump in the neck
  • Hoarseness lasting over two weeks

At the first onset of a sore throat it is always important to monitor the progress and recognize any other symptoms that may accompany the sore throat, which could cause it to worsen into strep throat, inflamed tonsils, or laryngitis. Contact your pediatrician if your child is experiencing a sore throat that won’t go away. Your pediatrician will help diagnose and treat your child’s symptoms. 

By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
November 20, 2017
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Immunizations  

Keeping children healthy is at the top of every pediatrician and parent's priority list. Besides hand-washing and a healthy diet, one of the immunizationsbest ways to ensure your child's health is to follow the immunization schedule suggested by Dr. Karen Beckman, Dr. Alejandro Mones, and Dr. Beth Rosenberg of Riverside Pediatrics, LLC in Greenwich, CT. To learn more about the benefits of immunizations, read on!

Reducing, even eliminating diseases

There are diseases - such as smallpox and polio, to name a few - that have been eradicated from the United States thanks to the advent of immunizations. However, there is much more international travel than ever before, and it's important to be fully vaccinated to prevent them from reoccurring. On a more probable level, there are still diseases like whooping cough, influenza, and chicken pox that remain a threat to both children and adults. Measles has not been eradicated. It is an ongoing problem in unvaccinated people in our country. There have been outbreaks in NYC and California not too long ago because of parents refusing to vaccinate their children. Being vaccinated also helps create protection for those who physically cannot be immunized due to health issues such as cancer, and to protect those too young to vaccinate, (newborns and infants). Vaccinating adults and older children protects babies and young children who are most vulnerable to complications or death from these diseases.

Dispelling rumors

Parents are understandably concerned about what goes into their children's bodies, and there are many misconceptions and outdated rumors about immunizations that your Riverside pediatrician wants to address. One of the main concerns is a potentially dangerous reaction to immunizations. A very small number of children have severe reactions to vaccines - less than one in a million - and studies repeatedly show that developmental problems like autism are not related to vaccinations. Many people are also concerned about the ingredients of the vaccines themselves. Ingredients like formaldehyde are included in vaccines for sanitizing and stabilizing purposes, but they are incredibly minute amounts, with much larger concentrations naturally occurring in the body.

If you're unsure whether your child is up to date on his or her immunizations, contact Riverside Pediatrics, LLC serving the Riverside and Greenwich, CT areas, to schedule an appointment with one of our caring providers. We look forward to helping you keep your children healthy!

By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
November 15, 2017
Category: Child Care
Tags: Sick Child   Common Cold   Sinusitis  

Common ColdMany people mistake a common cold for sinusitis, and vice versa, as the symptoms of a cold and a sinus infection can be quite similar to each other because the same viruses often cause both conditions. Additionally, since the nose and sinuses are connected, it is possible for viruses to move easily between the nasal passages and the sinuses. 

Your child may feel run down, have a low-grade fever, post-nasal drip and a sore throat. So is it a common cold or a sinus infection? Typically, a cold can definitely morph into a sinus infection, but there are some classic symptoms for each illness that can help distinguish between the two.

The Common Cold

With a cold, there is a cluster of symptoms that your child might be experiencing, including:

  • Nasal congestion
  • A run-down feeling
  • Runny nose with clear discharge
  • Sneezing
  • Sore throat
  • Post nasal drip
  • Fever may be seen in children, but not often in adults

If your child has a cold, they may even experience a cough or a headache, and it can often last from three to seven days with or without any treatment. Your child develops a cold from a virus in which the symptoms usually build slowly over the course of a day or two, peak by days three or four, then slowly improve around the fifth or seventh day. 

With a cold, treatment might include supportive care, fluids and chicken soup. Drinking plenty of water is also beneficial as it helps to hydrate your child. By hydrating your child through water consumption, you can help to flush out the infection because it liquefies the mucus. There are also medications available to help make your child more comfortable as the cold passes.

Sinusitis

Sometimes colds can set in the sinuses and cause swelling, which then prevents the flow of mucus and turns the cold into a sinus infection.  Sinusitis is the inflammation of the sinuses that can be caused by a cold, an infection or allergies. Any swelling of the sinuses can produce symptoms such as:

  • Pressure or pain behind the eyes or cheeks
  • Pain in the top teeth
  • Congestion
  • Green or yellow nasal drainage
  • Headache
  • Post nasal drip

Your child may also complain of being tired, having a difficult time breathing through his or her nose, decreased sense of smell and restless sleep. If your child develops a cold every month or every other month, this is because his or her sinuses are flaring up and it is probably not a cold, but chronic sinusitis. 

The main difference between a common cold and sinusitis is that a cold comes around once a year and lasts for three to five days, and then is gone and your child most likely will not experience it again until next year.  Acute sinusitis typically lasts less than four weeks, with chronic sinusitis lasting more than 12 weeks. So if your child’s symptoms last more than a week, odds are they are experiencing a sinus infection and should visit your pediatrician. 

By visiting your child’s pediatrician, you can help your child breathe easy once again. Whether it is a common cold, or a more serious sinus infection, your child’s pediatrician is available to help relieve their symptoms. 

By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
November 03, 2017
Category: Children's Care
Tags: Bedwetting  

Bedwetting is a common childhood problem. Many children who master toilet training during the day, usually between the ages of two and four, continue to experience episodes of bedwetting through the night. In many cases, the nighttime bedwetting incidents will gradually decrease until they have completely ceased around the age of five or six.

So, when should parents worry about their child’s bedwetting behaviors? Most pediatricians agree that it’s quite normal for children to experience occasional “accidents” and that most children will outgrow it on their own.

When to Visit Your Pediatrician

Bedwetting is rarely a serious problem. In fact, wetting up to a year after the child has successfully been toilet trained is normal. Children gain bladder control at different ages, and while most kids quit wetting at night by the age of 6, others may take a little longer. In the majority of cases, wetting does not have a medical cause.

According to the AAP, you should contact your pediatrician if your child continues to have frequent “accidents” or if you notice any of the following signs:

  • Wet clothing and bed linens, even when the child uses the toilet frequently
  • Unusual straining during urination, a very small or narrow stream of urine, or dribbling after urination
  • Cloudy or pink urine
  • Abnormal redness or rash in the genital area
  • Trying to conceal wetting by hiding clothes or underwear
  • Daytime wetting in addition to nighttime accidents

Parents should remember to be sensitive to their child’s wetting behavior so not to cause additional embarrassment or discomfort. Never punish the child for bedwetting. Instead, show support and encouragement by reassuring the child that it is not his or her fault and that the problem will get better.

Remember, even though childhood wetting is frustrating, it is very normal. Talk to your pediatrician if you have concerns about your child’s bedwetting behaviors. 

By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
October 13, 2017
Category: Safety and Health
Tags: Sun Safety  

Sun SafetyToo many parents wrongly assume that the sun is only dangerous when it’s shining brightly. The fact is, the sun’s rays are dangerous no matter what time of the year, and too much exposure during childhood can lead to serious problems later in life.

Parents should pay special care to protect their kids when playing outdoors. Here are a few simple tips to prevent overexposure to the sun:

  • Protect infants
    Keep babies younger than six months out of direct sunlight, protected by the shade of a tree or an umbrella.
  • Seek shade
    When possible, find a shaded area or take a break indoors to avoid sun exposure for extended periods of time. 
  • Limit outdoor play
    UV rays are the strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., so it’s best to avoid unnecessary exposure to the sun during midday.
  • Cover up
    Protective clothing that cover the arms and legs and wide brim hats can keep kids protected from sun damage.
  • Always apply sunscreen
    Choose a sunscreen made for kids with a SPF (sun protection factor) of at least 15. Apply to all areas of the body and reapply every few hours.

Sunburn is an obvious sign of sun damage, but a child doesn’t have to get a burn to experience the negative consequences of too much exposure to the sun. The effects of chronic sun exposure can also contribute to wrinkles, freckles, toughening of the skin and even cancer later in adulthood. In fact, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation, just one blistering sunburn in childhood more than doubles a person's chances of developing skin cancer later in life. 

As the saying goes, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” By setting good examples and teaching kids the importance of sun safety now, parents can significantly lower their child’s risk of developing skin cancer and other signs of sun damage as an adult.  

Always talk to you pediatrician if you have questions or concerns about sun safety and prevention.





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1171 East Putnam Avenue Unit 2B Riverside, CT 06878