My Blog

Posts for category: Children's Healthcare

By Karen Beckman
August 28, 2019
Tags: Sports Physicals  

Find out more about your child’s annual physical and why they are important for every child.

Have you scheduled your child’s next physical with our pediatricians at Riverside Pediatrics, LLC Dr. Karen Beckman, Dr. Alejandro kid-sportsMones, and Dr. Beth Rosenberg? Making sure that your child gets their annual physical before going back to school or participating in sports is crucial for their health (and sometimes mandatory for some schools). Whether it’s mandatory or not, here’s why these checkups should not be missed. We proudly serve the residents of Riverside, and Greenwich, Connecticut.
 

What is a sports physical?

Sometimes referred to as a pre-participation physical examination (PPE), this simple checkup will determine whether or not your child or teen is healthy enough to be able to participate in sports. If your child is beginning a new sport or workout routine it’s always a good idea to speak with your Greenwich children’s doctor, and a sports physical is an easy way to ensure that your child gets the checkup they need and a clean bill of health from their doctor.
 

But my child goes in once a year for a doctor’s checkup. Isn’t that enough?

While it’s important for your child to see their doctor at least once a year (or more often, depending on their age) this won’t take the place of a sports physical. A sports physical is focused specifically on the parts of their health that impact their ability to participate in sports.
 

What happens during a sports physical?

There are several things that will occur during your child’s checkup. First, our nurses will come in to check their vital signs (e.g. heart rate; blood pressure) and record their height and weight.

After this, your doctor will go through your child’s medical history. It’s important to document any past illnesses, hospitalizations, surgeries, injuries or current symptoms they are experiencing (e.g. abdominal pain; wheezing). Any information you provide can help our doctor identify possible problems that may be exacerbated or lead to health complications as a result of physical activity.

Lastly, your doctor will perform your child’s physical exam. During this exam, we make sure everything is healthy and functioning properly. We will listen to the heart and lungs, check your child’s reflexes, examine their posture, and check everything we need in order to protect your child from potential health problems both on and off the field. After all, certain conditions could leave your child prone to injury if you’re not careful but a physical exam can safeguard against this.

Don’t let your child get benched because they didn’t get a sports physical in time. Call Riverside Pediatrics, LLC serving the residents of Riverside, and Greenwich, Connecticut to schedule their annual physical with us. Call 203-629-5800.

By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
February 06, 2019
Tags: Whooping Cough  

Named after the characteristic sound of its notorious coughing fits, whooping cough is an extraordinarily uncomfortable condition that typically manifests itself in babies and in children ages 11 to 18 whose vaccine-provided immunities have begun to fade. In addition to causing several debilitating symptoms, whooping cough also carries the possibility of infant mortality, particularly for patients under 12 months old. Further complicating the matter, initial symptoms often resemble a common cold, making quick detection a tricky task. To be more proactive in the treatment and prevention of this disease, read below to learn the basics on whooping cough and how to best go about alleviating it.

What is Whooping Cough?

Officially diagnosed by the name pertussis, whooping cough is a highly contagious bacterial infection that resides within the nose and throat. Whooping cough is spread through airborne bacteria produced by an infected person’s sneezes, coughs, or laughs. Once whooping cough has been contracted, the apparent symptoms begin in an identical fashion to the common cold. That includes:

  • Runny nose

  • Mild cough

  • Fever (below 102 F)

  • Congestion and sneezing

After a week to 10 days, these symptoms begin to grow worse. Mucus thickens and starts to coat the patient’s airways, leading to rampant and prolonged coughing. These fits can be so violent that that they may cause vomiting, lengthy periods of extreme fatigue, and result in blue or red face. This last sign is the direct outcome of the body’s struggle to fill the lungs with air, and once breathing is finally achieved, the loud “whooping” sound that defines the condition is produced.

What are the Dangers of the Disease?

If left untreated, whooping cough can produce a number of painful and dangerous complications, with the specific ailments depending on the age of the patient.

For teens and adults, untreated whooping cough can result in:

  • Abdominal hernias

  • Bruised or cracked ribs

  • Broken blood vessels in the skin and whites of the eyes

For infants, complications from whooping cough are a great deal more severe. They include:

  • Pneumonia

  • Slowed or stopped breathing

  • Feeding difficulties, which may lead to dehydration and severe weight loss

  • Seizures

  • Brain damage

What Can I Do About It?

The best approach to preventing the disease is through vaccination. This is especially important for babies, as whooping cough leaves them in significant danger, though it is essential to keep your children on regular vaccination schedules, regardless of their individual age.

While vaccines are extremely effective in reducing the likelihood of contracting whooping cough, the possibility of developing the condition is still present. Due to this perpetual risk, if you witness your child’s cold symptoms continuing to worsen, arrange an appointment with their local pediatrician to find out if the problem may be whooping cough. If diagnosed early enough, antibiotics can be used to cut down on the painful symptoms and prevent the infection from spreading to others.

Concerned? Give Us a Call

Whooping cough is a serious condition that can be extremely dangerous if left untreated. If you have any suspicions that your child may have developed this condition, give us a call today!

By Riverside Pediatrics, LLC
March 02, 2018
Tags: Mono  

Understanding Mono: The “Kissing Disease”Mono

Often called the kissing disease, mononucleosis (mono) is a caused by a virus that is transmitted through saliva. You can get this infection through kissing, but you can also be exposed through a cough or sneeze, or even by sharing a glass or food utensils with someone who has mono. However, mono is not as contagious as some infections, such as the common cold.

As an adolescent or young adult, your child is most likely to get mono with all the signs and symptoms.  If your child has mono, it is important to be careful of certain complications such as an enlarged spleen. Your pediatrician urges you to allow your child proper rest and adequate fluids for a full recovery.  

Some of the signs and symptoms of mononucleosis may include:

  • Fatigue
  • General feeling of being unwell
  • Sore throat that doesn’t get better with antibiotic use
  • Fever
  • Swollen lymph nodes in neck and armpits
  • Swollen tonsils
  • Headache
  • Skin rash
  • Soft, swollen spleen

If your child is experience any of these symptoms, it is important to visit your pediatrician.

Since mononucleosis is spread through saliva, if your child is infected your pediatrician urges you to take extra precautions. To help prevent the spread of the virus, it is important to not kiss your child and not to share food, dishes, glasses and utensils until several days after his or her fever has subsided and even longer, if possible.

Contact your pediatrician for more information on mono and how you can help your child make a full recovery.



Contact Us

 
Greenwich: 203-629-5800
New Canaan: 203-920-1675